Feb 072017
 

With thanks to Yvette Rayner, PR Account Manager, Frasermedia.

L-R, Paul Whitecross, Nick Nairn and Ross Spence.

Three of Scotland’s finest chefs are teaming up to share their passion for food in a unique culinary experience, which is set to be a recipe for success for Aberdeen.
Nick Nairn, Ross Spence, executive chef at The Marcliffe Hotel & Spa and Paul Whitecross, executive chef at Trump International, will each present an individual course aimed at delighting the senses, showcasing their world-renowned gastronomic skills.

The trio are working together to cook-up Savour, a culinary feast which will take place on Saturday, 4th March, at the Marcliffe Hotel & Spa.

The event is being hosted alongside North East Sensory Services (NESS), a charity which supports people of all ages from babies to grandparents, who were born deaf or blind, or for those who have lost their sight or hearing.

The chefs will each create a course for the gastronomic adventure, focusing on the senses of taste, smell and sight, which coincides with the charity’s work with people with sensory issues.

Ross Spence said:

“It’s fantastic to be able to work with Nick and Paul for this event and we will present a superb overall dinner which will thoroughly delight the guests. NESS is an important charity in Aberdeen and across the North-east, supporting more and more people with hearing or sight loss, and we are delighted to host this unique evening.”

Paul Whitecross added:

“The team at Trump International is always keen to support charities which are important to the North-east community and this is set to be a fantastic foodie event to tantalise the tastebuds of the diners who are lucky enough to secure a place at this exclusive event.” 

Nick Nairn commented:

“Given our position with the business and our commitment to the North-east we wanted to be able to give something back to the community that supports us.  NESS is an excellent charity and it’s a wonderful opportunity and a wee challenge to create a feast which excites the senses.”

NESS CEO Graham Findlay said:

“We are delighted that these prestigious chefs are taking the time to devise and present a unique menu for NESS. We are looking forward to an incredible evening, which will excite the senses.

“Nick, Ross and Paul are great supporters of NESS and the Marcliffe Hotel & Spa has been a very good friend to the charity for many years.”

As well as a four-course dinner focusing on the senses of taste, smell, and sight, the evening will include a champagne drinks reception, a VIP auction and raffle, followed by entertainment and dancing.

Savour will take place on Saturday, 4th March, 2017, at the Marcliffe Hotel & Spa. Tables are priced at £950, with individual tickets available at £95, and can be purchased from neil.skene@nesensoryservices.org or by calling 0345 271 2345.

Issued by Frasermedia Ltd on behalf of NESS.

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Feb 012016
 

With thanks to Esther Green, Tricker PR.

NDCS-Small-Jo-Donaldson_Photography-96

Offering support to families when they need it the most. National Deaf Children’s Society is running a families weekend in Edinburgh this month.

Families of young deaf children from across Scotland who gather in Edinburgh later this month to learn that deafness is no barrier to preventing a child achieving their dreams. Peer support, expert advice and professional information will be available for families getting to grips with a baby or toddler’s diagnosis during a weekend course organised by the National Deaf Children’s Society (NDCS) and funded by Aberdeen Asset Management.

The gathering, on 27 and 28 February, will be attended by families from Angus, East Lothian, Orkney, Argyll and Bute, Midlothian, Glasgow and other parts of Scotland.

Over 90% of the 3,850 plus deaf children in Scotland are from hearing families with no previous history or experience of deafness, so for  many parents the diagnosis comes as a devastating and overwhelming shock.

The NDCS supports deaf children and young people, but in the early years of a child’s development, it is parents who need the charity the most.  With the low incidence of deafness in Scotland, families often find themselves to be unique within their immediate communities, leading to feelings of isolation and uncertainty.

Heather Gray, NDCS director for Scotland and Northern Ireland explains:

“The NDCS Early Years weekends empower and inform parents at a crucial stage in their child’s development, and offer vital support and advice at a time when parents are still getting to grips with their child’s diagnosis.

“Families receive clear, unbiased information from audiology, education and from local sources of support over the course of the weekend, giving parents the opportunity to explore the options that are available to their child and ask the questions they have been unable to ask in busy everyday situations.

“Through receiving this information in a safe and relaxed environment, parents are able to gain an understanding of childhood deafness and develop a network of support which can assist them now and in the future.”

By bringing families together, parents have the opportunity to share their experiences and access vital peer support that can often exist far beyond the weekend itself. In addition, families also find reassurance in the shared experiences of parent volunteers, and inspiration and encouragement through speaking to young deaf role models.

The impact of NDCS Early Years weekends is clear – parents have indicated they felt more confident in working with professionals to ensure the right support for their child as a result of becoming informed and connected.

One parent said:

“I have learned more about my child’s hearing loss in the past two days than I have in the past two months. It was eye opening to hear other people with similar or even more difficult circumstances. Great to share stories about struggles.”

Karin Hyland, of Aberdeen Asset Management’s Charitable Foundation said:

“The weekend will help 12 families; enabling parents to become part of a positive community network of mutual self-support. Families will also be informed about access to services which encourage improved community relations, reduce isolation and improve peer support through this valuable outreach work by the NCDS.”

The Aberdeen Asset Charitable Foundation was established in 2012 to formalise and develop the Group’s charitable giving globally. The Foundation seeks partnerships with smaller charities around the world, where funds can be seen to have a meaningful and measurable impact and the firm encourages its employees to use their time and skills to support its charitable projects.

For more information visit http://www.aberdeen-asset.co.uk/aam.nsf/foundation/home

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Jan 142016
 

With thanks to Esther Green, Senior Account Executive, Tricker PR.

NDCS-Small-Jo-Donaldson_Photography-96

Deafness is no barrier to children achieving great things, parents will learn on a weekend course run by NCDS and funded by Aberdeen Asset Management’s Charitable Foundation.

Parents will learn that deafness is no barrier to preventing their child achieving their dreams on a weekend course dedicated to providing peer support, expert advice and professional information for families getting to grips with a diagnosis.
Over 90% of deaf children in Scotland are from hearing families with no previous history or experience of deafness, so for many parents the diagnosis comes as a devastating and overwhelming shock.

Help is on hand from the National Deaf Children’s Society (NCDS) which, with a grant from Aberdeen Asset Management’s Charitable Foundation, is organising a weekend gathering for 12 families with deaf babies or toddlers living in Scotland to share experiences and learn more about the help and support available to them.

From birth through to independence, the NCDS supports deaf children and young people but in the early years of a child’s development, it is parents who will need the charity the most. With the low incidence of deafness in Scotland, families often find themselves to be unique within their immediate communities, leading to feelings of isolation and uncertainty.

Heather Gray, NDCS director for Scotland and Northern Ireland explains:

“The NDCS Early Years weekends empower and inform parents at a crucial stage in their child’s development, and offer vital support and advice at a time when parents are still getting to grips with their child’s diagnosis.

“Families receive clear, unbiased information from audiology, education and from local sources of support over the course of the weekend, giving parents the opportunity to explore the options that are available to their child and ask the questions they have been unable to ask in busy everyday situations.

“Through receiving this information in a safe and relaxed environment, parents are able to gain an understanding of childhood deafness and develop a network of support which can assist them now and in the future.”

By bringing families together, parents have the opportunity to share their experiences and access vital peer support that can often exist far beyond the weekend itself. In addition, families also find reassurance in the shared experiences of parent volunteers, and inspiration and encouragement through speaking to young deaf role models.

The NCDS has its Scottish headquarters in Glasgow, and the families weekend, open to families from across Scotland with a deaf child from birth to two years old, will take place in Edinburgh in February 2016.

The impact of NDCS’ Early Years weekends is clear – all parents who attended weekends in 2014 said they felt more positive about their child’s future, and all agreed that the weekend helped them to make positive decisions and choices. 100% of families also felt more confident in working with professionals to ensure the right support for their child. Over the two days, families become informed, empowered and connected, three characteristics that stay with them long into the future.

One parent said:

“I have learned more about my child’s hearing loss in the past two days than I have in the past two months.’ It was eye opening to hear other people with similar or even more difficult circumstances. Great to share stories about struggles.”

Karin Hyland, of Aberdeen Asset Management’s Charitable Foundation said: “The weekend will help 12 families; enabling parents to become part of a positive community network of mutual self-support.

“Families will also be informed about access to services which encourage improved community relations, reduce isolation and improve peer support through this valuable outreach work by the NCDS.”

The Aberdeen Asset Charitable Foundation was established in 2012 to formalise and develop the Group’s charitable giving globally. The Foundation seeks partnerships with smaller charities around the world, where funds can be seen to have a meaningful and measurable impact and the firm encourages its employees to use their time and skills to support its charitable projects.

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