Feb 202017
 

Fun Lovin’ Criminals provide an entertaining and engaging live show.

Fun Lovin’ Criminals brought some New York cool to The Garage in Aberdeen on a Friday night in February. Craig Chisholm reviews.

Wandering nonchalantly onstage with a drink in hand, frontman Huey Morgan toasted the crowd before he and the band – multi-instrumentalist Brian “Fast” Leiser and Leicester born drummer Frank Benbibni – launched into an 18 song set that covered their near 35 year career.

For such a quintessential New York band it’s ironic that their commercial breakthrough and subsequent peak came at the height of Britpop in the mid to late 90s and their song choice reflects this with a set heavy on tracks from debut album ‘Come Find Yourself’.

Opening with funky trumpet led track ‘The Fun Lovin’ Criminal’ the band blast through crowd pleasers such as the laid back ‘Smoke ‘Em’, the full on rock of ‘Bombin’ The L’ and, undoubted highlight of the night, the Tarantino movie dialogue sampling ‘Scooby Snacks’.

Tracks such as those highlight why the band became so popular at the time – the eclectic mix of hip-hop, rock, blues and soul delivered with a knowing nod and a wink draw their audience in and keep them enthralled throughout the night.

If any criticisms can be levelled at the group it would be that their later material doesn’t have the spark and imagination of their earlier work.

Later tracks from their most recent album ‘Classic Fantastic’ – released 7 years ago now! – such as the title track and ‘We, The Three’ aren’t met with such enthusiasm and recognition as cuts such as the Barry White referencing ‘Love Unlimited’.

Despite that, the band still keep the crowd on entertained for almost two hours.

Singer Huey may be better known nowadays as a Radio 6 presenter and TV host in the, thankfully, short lived series ‘Pet Nation’ he bizarrely hosted with Liza Tarbuck but it’s on stage that he’s at home.

His between song banter is entertaining and humorous – tall tales about hotel maids and of meetings with Mafia Boss John Gotti Jr to discuss the song ‘King Of New York’, which references his notorious Father, are all delivered with friendliness and laughs.

Closing their main set with a cover of James Bond theme song ‘We Have All The Time In The World’ the band return for a three song encore that includes ‘Friday Night’ performed exclusively for the fact that it is, indeed, Friday night.

At the end of the day, Fun Lovin’ Criminals may not be as commercially successful or as prolific with new material as they once were but they still provide an entertaining and engaging live show that will leave you with a smile on your face.

Pictures © Craig Chisholm.

Feb 202017
 

With thanks to Ross Anderson, Senior Account Manager, Citrus:Mix.

A north-east family has won a new Mini in a popular annual fundraiser which supports a leading cancer charity.
Susan Green, from Peterhead, bought several tickets in a raffle organised by CLAN Cancer Support and Rotary Clubs across the north-east of Scotland. Half were put in her name and half for her husband, Karl Green.

After buying the tickets Mrs Green didn’t think much more about the raffle until she received a surprise visit from Angie Christie, CLAN’s North Aberdeenshire area co-ordinator on Christmas Eve to let her know that her husband had won the car.

Mrs Green, who works part-time as an accountant with Ocean Installer in Aberdeen, raised more than £900 for CLAN earlier in the year by organising a craft fayre after the charity supported her father, John Reid, during his cancer treatment.

As Mr Green was working overseas when the car was available for collection, Mrs Green received the keys from Mr Alastair Brookes, CLAN’s fundraising manager.

Mrs Green, 35, said:

“It was a lovely surprise when Angie came round on Christmas Eve to let us know we had the winning ticket. My husband Karl and I are delighted and our children James, Rachael and William all love it.

“We’ve been very lucky to win the car and it’s been great using it to get around town. It’s also very useful for dropping the kids off at school and visiting our friends and family. We’re very proud of it.”

More than £54,000 was raised for the raffle through ticket sales. The raffle is an integral part of CLAN’s fundraising campaign and is run by Rotary Clubs in and around the North East with members of 22 Rotary Clubs being involved.

With the Mini being part sponsored by Dominoes, the net funds raised are then shared between CLAN Cancer Support, which receives the majority of the funds, and the Rotary Clubs who in turn use their share to help a variety of smaller charities in the area.

Alastair Brookes, Head of Fundraising at CLAN Cancer Support, said:

“To be able to give someone the news that they have won a brand-new car on Christmas Eve is very special, and even more so when it is someone who has first-hand experience of the services and support CLAN provides.

“We hope Karl, Susan and her family enjoy their new car and we’d like to wish them happy travels in the years ahead.

“The raffle is a hugely important part of our fundraising and I would like to thank each of the Rotary clubs which help us so much with it each year. Their dedication and kindness really does make all the difference. We would also like to thank everyone who supported us by buying a raffle ticket.”

Alan Pirie, of the Aberdeen and North East Rotary Clubs, said:

“We were delighted to partner with CLAN Cancer Support again and would like to extend our congratulations to Karl on winning the Mini raffle.

“Our members sold raffle tickets at various events across the north-east throughout the year and it is lovely to see the Mini go to a family who will be able to make good use of the car.”

CLAN Cancer Support is an independent charity which provides comfort, support and information, free of charge, for anyone, of any age, affected by any type of cancer. CLAN aims to support people to reduce anxiety, stress and to increase their ability to cope with the effects of a serious illness.

Based in Aberdeen, the charity covers the whole of north-east Scotland, Moray, Orkney and Shetland. CLAN has a presence in Ballater, Banchory, Elgin, Buckie, Inverurie, Fraserburgh, Lossiemouth, Peterhead, Stonehaven, Turriff, Kirkwall and Lerwick.

For more information about CLAN Cancer Support, please call (01224) 647 000 or visit www.clanhouse.org

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Feb 172017
 

Duncan Harley reviews The Woman in Black – at His Majesty’s Theatre Aberdeen

If you enjoy being scared of things which go thump in the night, then this play-within-a-play is a must see.

Essentially a two man show, The Woman in Black gets off to what appears to be a slow start. As an elderly Arthur Kipps hums and haws hilariously over his acting ability, the theatre audience may wonder if the bigging-up of the production as a celebration of nerve shredding horror is, perhaps, simply a publicist’s whim.

However, and with a nerve shattering bang, the tone soon changes from that of gentle hilarity to one of spine-tingling terror and, thanks to some splendid pre-recorded screams and a ton or two of dry-ice, theatre-goers are soon transported along Nine Lives Causeway to Eel Marsh House, home of the late Mrs Drablow.

The set is simple and quite bare and the tale is set “in this theatre about one hundred years ago”.

Retired solicitor Arthur Kipps has engaged The Actor in the hope of shedding the phantoms of his past. He seeks closure and is intent on presenting his disturbing story to a theatre audience in the form of what must be considered a blatant act of exorcism.

Early on David Acton, as the elderly Kipps, assures both audience and The Actor, played ably by Matthew Spencer, “Forgive me, I’m not an actor.” However this is patently not the case.

Both performers are master storytellers, and the audience quickly becomes engaged. As the tension builds, there are moments of terror interspersed with some very wry humour indeed.

For example, just as things begin to look pretty damn serious for The Actor, who by this time is playing a much younger Mr Kipps, on trots Spider the invisible dog. This is not at all as absurd as it may sound, since the audience have by this time become accustomed to suspension of disbelief: minimalist multi-purpose props have by this point become quite acceptable and they have, after all, just seen an imaginary pony.

Alongside some unmistakable shades of a much darker than normal Miss Havisham, Bram Stoker’s Dracula inspiration Sir Henry Irving gets a brief but well noted mention or three. The play is, after all a Gothic Horror feast.

This is an entertaining piece of theatre and there are many startling moments. While the play might not be for everyone, the slick timing and understated dialogue may well challenge the preconceptions of those not normally drawn to the genre.

There is of course a strange twist at the end of the tale, how could there not be after all? As to the nature of this curveball, my lips are, naturally, completely sealed.

Directed by Robin Herford and adapted from Susan Hill’s novel by Stephen Mallatratt, The Woman in Black plays at HMT Aberdeen until Saturday February 18th.

Tickets from Aberdeen Performing Arts Tel: 01224- 641122

Words © Duncan Harley and Images © APA

Feb 172017
 

With thanks to Yvette Rayner, PR Account Manager, Frasermedia.

A football-mad Aberdeen family firm is helping local youngster to gear up for local football festivals. Greenwell Equipment (Greenwell), which is based in East Tullos, has provided high quality track-suit tops and bottoms to 27 boys at Newmachar United Football Club. 

The boys, aged 6-8 years, attend football festivals across the North-east and train at the Newmachar Axis Centre.

Mark Turnbull, managing director of Greenwell, is a big supporter of the club, and his son Cal, age 6, has been playing with Newmachar United FC for over two years.

Greenwell Equipment supplies modular buildings, containers, warehouse shelving and pallet racking and office furniture across the world, and the family run firm employs 15 people.

Managing director Mark is a keen football fan, and played himself as a boy and young man. He has recently started assisting the coaches at the club, with a view to training to becoming a qualified coach.

Mr Turnbull said:

“I am delighted to help out Newmachar United FC. It is a great, local club, which gives youngsters the chance to get some exercise, acquire new skills and learn how to work well in a team. Greenwell Equipment also supports Aberdeen Football Club’s Youth Academy, as we see football as an important local activity and also a great discipline and training ground for young people.”

Derek Reid, one of the coaches for the club said:

“We are really grateful for Mark and Greenwell for their support. We often attend football festivals and the other teams all look great in their kit, so we are thrilled to see our boys all now looking professional. It gives the players a real sense of pride and belonging. Newmachar United FC is an inclusive club, there are no try-outs, and we are open to every child of any ability, so we try to keep our costs to a minimum.

“Kit sponsorship is important as it makes the boys proud to belong to Newmachar United FC, and encourages them to try their best for the team. The cost of football strips, equipment and transport can add up, so we welcome all the support we can get. The boys are delighted with the new, warm track-suits which they are wearing with pride.”

Greenwell Equipment comprises of four divisions, encompassing: Greenwell Warehousing, a supplier of high quality shelving and pallet racking; Greenwell Cabins, a distributor of accommodation and welfare modules; Greenwell Office, a supplier of a wide range of business furniture both new and second-hand, and Greenwell Containers, a supplier of high-quality shipping containers.

Family-run business Greenwell, which has 15 employees, is the North of Scotland official trading partner for Containex modular buildings. Greenwell holds a large stock at its depots across Aberdeen and Angus, enabling the firm to respond quickly to customers’ demands.

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Feb 102017
 

With thanks to Richard Bunting, Director, Richard Bunting PR.

Record numbers of three dolphin species off Scotland’s west coast were recorded by conservation charity Hebridean Whale and Dolphin Trust in its marine research expeditions in 2016. 
From the trust’s specialized research yacht Silurian, volunteers and scientists recorded 2,303 individual common dolphins, 42 bottlenose dolphins and 94 Risso’s dolphins – the figures for all three species being the highest ever recorded in its annual survey seasons.

Average annual figures documented over the previous 14 years were 463 individual common dolphins, 14 bottlenose dolphins and 12 Risso’s dolphins. 

For common dolphins, these records range from 0 individuals encountered in a couple of the earlier field seasons to 1,862 during the 2007 season. 

Dr. Lauren Hartny-Mills, Science Officer of Hebridean Whale and Dolphin Trust, said:

“The reasons for the high number of sightings of these charismatic dolphin species – and the broader effects on the marine environment and other species – remain unclear. But the intriguing findings highlight the importance of on-going monitoring and research – to strengthen our understanding of what is taking place in Hebridean waters, and to ensure well-informed conservation action.”

The latest findings were made in a research season lasting from May to October 2016, as part of the trust’s unique long-term citizen science project monitoring whales, dolphins and porpoises – collectively known as cetaceans – as well as basking sharks in the Hebrides.

These annual research surveys depend on paying volunteers, with 71 welcomed aboard in 2016 – working with marine scientists on visual surveys and acoustic monitoring with underwater microphones or hydrophones, and identifying individual cetaceans through photography.

The Isle of Mull-based organisation now holds data from more than 95,000km of survey effort. It aims to pass the 100,000km milestone during 2017, and it is currently recruiting volunteers to support this by working as citizen scientists onboard Silurian for periods of almost two weeks from April to September.

Alison Lomax, Director of Hebridean Whale and Dolphin Trust, said: “The impressive range of species documented in our at-sea surveys last year is a powerful reminder that Scotland’s west coast ocean environment is home to remarkable marine life. Long-term scientific studies of this globally-important habitat and its inhabitants are crucial if we are to ensure a secure future for the Hebrides’ spectacular cetaceans.”

During 2016, Silurian – previously used in filming of the BBC’s The Blue Planet series – covered more than 5,000 nautical miles, compared to an average of almost 4,000 miles annually over the previous 14 years. Its crew documented more than 1,300 cetaceans and basking sharks, and recorded almost 700 hours of underwater detections of cetaceans using specialist listening equipment.

Notable highlights included a wonderful encounter with a humpback whale in the northern Minch – an hour was spent with the massive creature lunge feeding, tail slapping and swimming under Silurian, alongside a large group of common dolphins.

2016 also saw Hebridean Whale and Dolphin Trust’s first expeditions running out of Ullapool, allowing for surveys in the more northern and western parts of the charity’s study area.

Western Scotland’s seas are one of Europe’s most important cetacean habitats. With a long, complex coastline, strong ocean currents and a variety of habitats, the Hebrides is one of the UK’s most biologically productive areas. So far 24 of the world’s estimated 92 cetacean species have been recorded in the region – many being national and international conservation priority species.

Yet marine ecosystems are fragile, and cetaceans face increasing stress from human activities – including climate change, entanglement, pollution, underwater noise and habitat degradation.

Hebridean Whale and Dolphin Trust has been monitoring marine mega fauna in the Hebrides since 1994, and from Silurian since 2002. Its surveys are partly funded by a generous grant from Scottish Natural Heritage, which supports the training of future mammal scientists.

The charity is the only organisation collecting long-term data on such a large scale on Scotland’s west coast, and its volunteers and scientists have now recorded more than 12,000 cetaceans. A short film about surveys can be seen at https://youtu.be/M_3r-GKfh8o.

Participation costs for the forthcoming 2017 surveys cover boat expenses, accommodation, training, food and insurance, and support the trust’s research. For details of how to take part, contact volunteercoordinator@hwdt.org, call 01688 302620, or visit www.hwdt.org.

 

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Feb 102017
 

With thanks to Jessica Murphy, Senior Account Executive, Citrus:Mix.

CLAN Cancer Support has announced the appointment of a new Head of Fundraising. Alastair Brookes has been chosen for the key role and brings with him more than 20 years’ of experience in the third sector.

Alastair has strong links throughout the business community and north-east Scotland, and has previously held roles in a variety of organisations including Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDFR) and Tay/Northsound Radio.

While at JDRF, he was responsible for the strategic development of the organisation’s fundraising strategy throughout Scotland, driving forward awareness of the charity and financial support.

He also led the development and delivery of a number of high profile fundraising events.

In his new position Alastair will spearhead income generation for CLAN, developing fundraising activities throughout the CLAN in the community network, and be a key member of the senior management team.

Dr Colette Backwell, chief executive of CLAN, said:

“Alastair’s wealth of experience and expertise in the charitable sector are a fantastic fit for CLAN and I am delighted to welcome him to the role.

“This is an exciting time for us as we continue to work towards our aim of bringing CLAN’s services closer to the heart of communities in Aberdeen and the north-east, providing support to anyone affected by cancer whenever it is needed.

“In the current economic climate, how organisations approach fundraising activity is crucial. The dedication of our team ensures we can continue to develop our services and help anyone affected by a cancer diagnosis. Alastair will lead the way on the progression of our fundraising activity and I look forward to working closely with him and building on CLAN’s success.”

Alastair Brookes added:

“I’m delighted to be joining CLAN at an important time for the organisation. CLAN is held in the highest regard throughout the north-east and Northern Isles and I am looking forward to helping the charity to further develop its successful fundraising activity.

“CLAN’s support of those affected by cancer and their families is essential, and the charity has ambition to reach and help even more people in years ahead. In order to achieve that we must continually develop our fundraising streams, engaging with supporters past and present and developing our range of events and initiatives.

“I look forward to bringing my 20 years’ of experience to the role and help raise vital funds and awareness for CLAN, as well as being part of an inspirational team that go above and beyond to help anyone affected by cancer.”

Based in Aberdeen, CLAN covers the whole of north-east Scotland, Moray, Orkney and Shetland. The charity has a presence in Ballater, Banchory, Buckie, Elgin, Buckie, Inverurie, Fraserburgh, Lossiemouth, Peterhead, Stonehaven, Turriff, Kirkwall and Lerwick.

For more information about CLAN Cancer Support, please call (01224) 647 000 or visit www.clanhouse.org.

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Feb 102017
 

With thanks to Esther Green, Senior Account Executive, Tricker PR

As cybercrime continues to be a real and growing menace to business, data backup must become a greater part of continuity planning, according to a Scottish IT business leader.

Data backup is one of the most important areas of IT and yet is also one of the most ignored, Austen Clark of Clark Integrated Technologies has warned ahead of World Backup Day on March 31.

A study last year found that while 36% backup their business data entirely there are 36% who back nothing up at all.

“It is the time put a clear focus on data backup, with man-made cybercrime threats adding another dimension to the risk of data being destroyed or deleted” says Mr Clark.

“We are living in a data-driven society and data is crucial to the smooth running of any business.

“As such backing up data is an essential security measure in today’s computing world. The rise in ransomware attacks which effectively take data hostage from business is just one example of how data loss can happen.  An attack can has financial implications and can cost hundreds or thousands of pounds to businesses.

“Data has gained intrinsic value, either in the staff time needed to generate it or in its relevance to your clients. Data loss, both accidental and due to theft, costs millions of pounds to businesses every year.”

Mr Clark answers some of the most commonly posed questions around the subject.

What is backing up?

Quite simply, backing up is making a copy of your most important files which can be used if the original copy is lost, with the second copy ideally held at different location to the original and be kept in a secure environment.

It is usual for data to be saved to just one place, like ‘My Documents’ on a PC’s hard drive but if this data were accidentally changed or deleted it would take considerable time and expense to restore, with the possibility it may never to be recovered.

Growing numbers of computer viruses have become a risk to business information, and once they have infected your machine they may delete or corrupt your data.

Other common causes of date loss are physical failure of a PC or Server, accidental error, theft or disasters like fire, flood or even simply a dropped glass of water.

Data backup should be specifically tailored for your business.

What data should I backup?

When choosing what data to back up think about what you would need to continue working if your network was damaged.

Clients address, telephone details, your account information, important documents. How long has it taken you to collate all this information and what would happen if you couldn’t get it back once lost? These are the key questions to think about around backing up.

What types of backup are there?

There are various types of backup available and the one you choose will generally depend on time, security and budget. There are a number of frequently used backup solutions to suit business needs.

Memory stick devices tend to be used for smaller backups or mobile users. These are usually removable hard drives and are very popular. The disadvantages of these cheaper devices are that they are at times unreliable and easy to lose or damage due to their small size. The data which is held on them is usually unsecured, meaning if customer details or financial information is held on them this is a greater risk if they were to be lost or used by unauthorised personnel.

When a backup is done the previous backup is overwritten, meaning that only one version of the backup can be stored.

Tape backup is an old industry standard backup medium for businesses with a reasonable amount of data to backup. Daily, weekly and monthly backups can be carried out and as long as you have a managed tape rotation and store the tapes offsite it is a possibility to use this backup solution.

The disadvantages of tape are that it is slow, both to backup and to restore. As it is a manual process it can be subject to error and unless you remember to take the tapes offsite on a daily basis it is subject to the same threats as the original backup.

Online data backup is an efficient choice for small and medium businesses. There is no need to purchase hardware or software, just  a monthly service. Select the data you want to backup and it is transferred in an encrypted format to a high security data centre.

Backups are fully automated, meaning no user intervention is required and you can restore single files or full backups at the click of a mouse. Full protection and availability make this an attractive option. Different versions of backups are available, covering accidental changes made or deletions.

What other considerations are there?

Always test your recovery data – a backup is useless if it cannot restore correctly. Backup regularly, you don’t want to find out the last copy you made is several months old. Keep your backups off site, that way if you do lose data to a fire, flood or theft you know you can retrieve your information.

What about personal devices?

Research shows that 30% of people have never backed up but with 113 phones lost or stolen every two minutes and one in 10 computers infected with a virus each month it is just as important to back up data here too which means it can be saved in the event of a disaster or accident.

 

 

 

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Feb 052017
 

League business returned to Pittodrie today, with a visit to the city of Glasgow’s oldest established professional football club. By Red Fin Hall.

After yet another defeat last Wednesday to Celtic, the need to get back to winning ways was crucial.

McInnes decided to start with the same team that he went with in the previous six games, despite a section of fans calling for Ash Taylor to be replaced.

Fans are fickle.

But it was good to see Jonny Hayes still at the club. He will have to wait until summer at least before he can buy his sought after iPhone 7s.

Referee, Greg Aitken, got the game underway at precisely the allocated time on another cold and sunny day. The Dons won their first free kick in seven minutes, but it was too far out for Niall McGinn to do anything with.

Partick Thistle number 19, Ryan Edwards, was the first opposition player to try and make a breakthrough, but to no avail. Five minutes later the visitors were awarded their first free kick. It was taken from within the centre circle, but it was well intercepted by Kenny McLean. Good strong play by him.

Just after, Daniel Devine played a poor passback to Tomas Cerny in the Thistle goal, giving the keeper only enough time to hoof it out of play for an Aberdeen throw in. The culmination of the set piece was a 12th minute shot by McLean from the edge of the box which was bundled safely away by their goalie.

The Dons meant business, and after receiving the pass from Graeme Shinnie, McGinn tried an shot from around 30 yards out. It was a pretty poor, but it took a deflection off Devine and nearly caught Cerny out.

The first corner of the game went to Partick in the 17th minute. Two minutes after that award, they were give a free kick which was taken by the lively Edwards. It caused Joe Lewis no problem.

Aberdeen that had a good chance to open the scoring when a very good ball in from Jonny Hayes was aimed towards Adam Rooney, but his attempt at an overhead kicked only ended up with the forward swiping at fresh air. Fortunately, the ball arrived at the feet of Andrew Considine, who was pushing up from defence. He had a reasonable chance, but his effort towards the goal from within the area was not good enough.

Alan Archibald, obviously, had a plan to deal with Aberdeen, which mainly consisted of playing nine across the back any time the Reds pushed forward. It was working, as the home team were huffing and puffing their way through the game at this juncture. Don’t get me wrong, there was some tidy enough play, but when Ash Taylor put a low diagonal pass towards Rooney, in the 23rd minute, it was just out of reach.

The Aberdeen defence was caught out when Stephen Lawless and Kris Doolan were on their own up front, bearing down on Lewis. Running back from his more forward position, McGinn made a timely tackle just as they were lining up the shot.

Partick were no mugs and kept trying.

That seemed to wake the Dons up a bit, and Ryan Jack had a shot on target from 25 yards out. It was headed clear by Liam Lindsay, who was wearing a protective face mask, for a corner.

This was taken by McGinn, from the left, reaching Taylor who executed a superb header which just went inches past the post.

Just before the half hour mark, Hayes, up to his usual high standard, showed some exemplary play by beating three players and firing a low cross in to be met by McLean, whose shot was just wide.

Partick were no mugs and kept trying. They broke upfield again, and won another corner. But as with all the set pieces from both sides today, Edwards’ effort was poor.

36 minutes in, Taylor showed the good side of his play, when he executed a smashing interception as Partick captain, Abdul Osman, had only Lewis to beat. This was a better period of play from the visitors. Number 13, Adam Barton, tried a low ball in from the right, but it was easily held by Lewis.

The Dons were awarded a free kick just inside the opposition half, too far out to try a shot. Shay Logan fired the ball into the goal area, causing problems amongst the Partick defence and culminating in an on target shot from Shinnie.

With half time approaching, there seemed to be a temporary period where Rooney lacked commitment, as his control of a Hayes pass left a lot to be desired. Things weren’t helped when he got his head to a ball into the area from McGinn, and the referee awarded an ‘alternative foul’.

Just before the whistle blew, Shinnie was clearly held, but the referee was extremely slow to react.

Half time: 0-0.

No changes to the line ups as Thistle started brightly with a good ball in from the left by number 14, Chrissie Elliot, to Edwards. Thankfully his shot went wide. The Aberdeen defence were fair caught napping there.

The game was stopped soon after when Jack went down and needed treatment for a head knock. The referee though saw nothing wrong with the challenge that meant the captain had to leave the field for a few minutes.

McGinn then had one of his trademark runs into the box, but the move petered out when the final ball fro Shinnie was below par.

Partick made the first sub when Kris Doolan was replaced by the robust looking, Ade Azeez.

A brave decision when it was still goal-less.

Andrew Considine was booked in 55 minutes for a foul on Osman. The resultant free kick was headed over. It looked at this stage like maybe Wednesday’s defeat to Celtic was having an affect on the players.

Partick made the first substitution when Kris Doolan was replaced by the robust looking, Ade Azeez.

Something needed to be changed for the Dons, and Derek McInnes made the controversial decision to take off two defenders, Logan and Mark Reynolds, and replace them with Jayden Stockley and recent loan signing from Celtic, Ryan Christie. This meant they changed to playing with a three man defence with Jack dropping back into the centre of the three; McGinn and Hayes were utilised as wing backs. A brave decision when it was still goal-less.

However, the double substitution appeared to be a great move, as pretty soon after taking to the field, Christie tried to chip the keeper. Unfortunately it went straight to Cerny.

In the 70th minute, Hayes on fire, hit a ferocious shot into the box, which Cerny could only turn round for a Corner.

From the corner, McGinn fired an inswinger into the box and, unmarked, Stockley beautifully headed the pall into the net for the deserved opener.

1-0

Partick made a second change when David Amoo was taken off and Chris Erskine came on.

Cerny had to be sharp, when a McGinn cross was heading for Stockley as he was trying get his second goal. Partick were struggling to contain Aberdeen now, with Rooney, Stockley and Christie proving to be a handful up front. Christie tried again, albeit unsuccessfully, to lob the keeper after receiving a pass from Stockley.

In the 79th minute, Considine and Jack were uncharacteristically caught out when Azeez got a pretty good shot in. He was disappointed to see it go six inches past the post. A lucky escape for the Dons.

The final substitutions were forthcoming when Partick’s Kevin Nisbet came on for Edwards, and Rooney was replaced by defender Anthony O’Connor with less than ten minutes to play. Reverting to a four man defence, Shinnie went to left back and Jack went back into midfield.

With only four minutes left, Aberdeen went looking for another goal to kill the game, and a cute back heeler from Hayes found Shinnie, but nothing came of it.

Partick weren’t dead and buried yet, but their final chance came when Azeez had a crack. But his ball went high, wide, and not very handsome. The fourth official then indicated there would be four minutes of stoppage time to play.

It was two minutes into it when, as the Dons, finishing the game on a high, kept the pressure up. It paid off when solo striker, Stockley, flicked the ball unselfishly to Christie, who finished off comfortably for his debut goal in only his second appearance.

Full time: 2-0. 

A very tactically astute football match by both managers, but McInnes assuredly won that particular battle. Next home game is on 15 Feb, when the rescheduled match v Motherwell takes place. Hope the floodlights stay on!

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Feb 022017
 

Owner of Hunstman barbers, Kyle Ross. Huntsman PR images.

With thanks to Gemma Setter, PR Account Executive, Frasermedia.

A young entrepreneur has invested a five-figure sum to land a new barber venture in Aberdeen.

Huntsman, a new luxury gents barbers based in the city’s Union Street, has officially opened its doors after a month-long renovation on the city centre property.

Established by managing director, Kyle Ross, the business has committed to a ten-year lease and has created three jobs, with plans to increase this in the future.

Mr Ross, 27, has almost ten years of industry experience and has worked in some of Aberdeen’s top hair salons. He now hopes to bring the innovative barbering trends that are taking bigger cities by storm to the Granite City through his new business venture.

The barbers, which is based between Union Street and Albyn Place, offers a wide range of services for the modern day man, including everything from precision cutting, hot towel shaving, beard trimming and styling, to massage treatments and waxing.

It also provides in-depth consultations to its customers, which allows them to decide on the cut and style that will best suit their face shape and hair type.

Named after the inventor of the straight razor, Huntsman is the only barbers in Aberdeen to stock stylish Hanz de Fuko hair products and is the only one north of Glasgow to offer the distinctive Brighton Beard Company products to its clients.

The 950 sq ft premises has an additional 500 sq ft basement for possible expansion. It features a stylish, contemporary interior, with a black and copper colour scheme, and has a 50” plasma TV screen dedicated to playing Sky Sports.  

Managing director of Huntsman, Kyle Ross, said:

“It was always part of my career plan to open my own place, so I’m thrilled that all the hard work has paid off and my dream has become a reality.

“I realised I had a flair for the barbering side of hairdressing and I enjoy following gents trends. It is certainly an exciting time for barbers, as there has been a dramatic change in behaviour in regards to male grooming over the past few years. Men tend to be much more image conscious and it is now all about slick haircuts and facial hair.

“I wanted to create an environment that was completely different to the walk-in barbers that most men are used to. Guys can relax in the knowledge that we will spend as much time that is needed on their hair, rather than just a quick five-minute job. We talk customers through the entire process and give them guidance on what styles would suit them best.  

“My team and I are dedicated to providing a high-quality service to everyone that walks through the door. We will be focusing on regular training, so that we can provide our clients with the most up-to-date industry knowledge.”

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Feb 022017
 

Scottish soprano Jillian Bain Christie

With thanks to Ian McLaren, PR account manager, Innes Associates.

A specially arranged version of a classic Robert Burns love song received its Burns Night debut in Aberdeen.
Local soprano Jillian Bain Christie treated guests at Malmaison Aberdeen’s annual Burns Supper to a version of Ae Fond Kiss that has been specially written for her by renowned north-east composer Professor Paul Mealor FRSA.

The song forms part of Jillian’s debut album, Ae Spark o’ Nature’s Fire, a compilation of 14 works penned by Scotland’s national bard, including some of his best-known love songs.

Jillian, who as well as being an acclaimed singer is also a talented visual artist, was taught by Professor Mealor while studying for a music degree at the University of Aberdeen and also sang the soprano solo in his Symphony No 1: Passiontide

To thank Jillian for her involvement in some of his previous musical projects he chose to compose this arrangement of Burns’ most recorded love song to appear on her first album.

Professor Mealor is an admired composer whose works include Ubi Caritas, which premiered at the wedding of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, and the 2011 Christmas number one hit Wherever You Are, which was performed by the Military Wives choir.

Ae Spark o’ Nature’s Fire was released last year by independent Aberdeen record label Luckenbooth Music. The album, which also features pianist Catherine Herriott, is a collection of Burns songs that are sung to arrangements by contemporary and 20th century Scottish composers including Rory Boyle and John Maxwell Geddes.

Tracks include Ye Banks and Braes o’ Bonnie Doon, The Deil’s awa’ wi’ the Exciseman and Bonnie Wee Thing. Alongside the specially arranged version of Ae Fond Kiss, other highlights of the album include unaccompanied versions of A Red, Red Rose and John Anderson, My Jo.

Frances Milne, co-founder of Luckenbooth Music, said:

“Robert Burns is revered around the world and many of his songs have achieved iconic status.  Ae Spark o’ Nature’s Fire presents 14 of his songs in a refreshed and new way, providing an album that appeals to fans of both traditional Scottish and classical music

“This new version of Ae Fond Kiss is a beautiful arrangement that illustrates the skill of composer, singer and pianist.  Those attending the Burns Supper at Malmaison will be left in no doubt about the brilliance of Paul Mealor’s arrangement and Jillian’s recital of it.

“Jillian’s unaccompanied, pared-back version of A Red, Red Rose showcases her vocal ability.  The melody was originally written as a fiddle tune and features great leaps in range, which are normally technically difficult for the voice.  However, Jillian’s trained voice copes with the melody with ease.  It is one of the stunning highlight of the album.”

Ae Spark o’ Nature’s Fire is on sale now and can be purchased directly from Luckenbooth Music and Amazon, in selected retailers, or as a download via iTunes and Google Play.  Notes accompanying the CD give a comprehensive insight into Burns as a songwriter and song collector, while a glossary provides an understanding to the many Scots words used in the songs.

Born and raised in Aberdeen, Jillian Bain Christie studied fine print making at Glasgow School of Art, before gaining a masters degree in illustration at Edinburgh College of Art. The former Mile End Primary and Aberdeen Grammar pupil worked as an artist for a number of years before embarking on a music degree at the University of Aberdeen, graduating in 2012 with a first-class honours degree. 

She then studied in London at the Trinity London Conservatoire of Music and Dance, gaining a masters degree in fine art in creative performance practice.

Luckenbooth Music is an independent Scottish record label. Based in Aberdeen, it was established in 2016 by Frances Milne and her brother John Milne. The label’s first release was Ae Spark o’ Nature’s Fire, a collection of songs by Robert Burns which were performed by Aberdeen soprano Jillian Bain Christie and accompanied by pianist Catherine Herriott. 

A luckenbooth is a traditional Scottish wedding brooch given to a bride by her groom on their wedding day. For more information visit www.luckenboothmusic.co.uk or telephone 01224 311468.

A preview of the tracks can be listened to via SoundCloud by visiting https://soundcloud.com/luckenbooth-music

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